Courses

A. Torah She'be'al Peh (Oral Law - Talmud)
 
1. 
Talmud (Advanced)
 
Classroom lectures focus upon in-depth analysis of Tosefot and Rishonim commentaries with special emphasis placed on Rambam (Maimonides). During Beit Midrash self-study sessions, the student, under the guidance of faculty, is required to independently prepare the Talmud text with assigned commentaries.
 
Credits: 6 per semester
 
 
2. 
Talmud (Intermediate)
 
Emphasis is placed on developing the skills of reading and preparation of the Talmud text with the commentaries of Rashi and Tosefot and select Rishonim. The analytical skills required for in-depth Talmud study are introduced.
 
Credits: 6 per semester
 
 
3. 
Talmud (Mechina)
 
Emphasis is placed on the requisite linguistic and methodological skills for proper study of the Talmud text with the commentary of Rashi and selected Tosefot.
 
Credits: 6 per semester
 
 
4. 
Talmud - Bekiut Level I
 
Emphasis is placed on broadening the student’s scope of knowledge and familiarizing him with both the format and vocabulary of the Babylonian Talmud.This form of study is in contrast to the highly analytical style of study of the previous sections. Approximately 60-70 pages are studied, and occasional commentary is introduced.
 
Credits: 4 per semester
 
 
5. 
Talmud - Bekiut Advanced
 
Same as A4. Approximately 70-90 pages are studied, and occasional commentary is introduced. Emphasis is placed on independent study.
 
Credits: 4 per semester
 
 
6. 
Talmud - Halacha Orientation
 
A select number of advanced students are allowed to register for a second bekiut course which studies sections of a tractate with the relevant sections of Tur-Shulchan Aruch.
 
Credits: 2 per semester
 
 
7. 
Mishna
 
Students participate in a self-study Mishna study program under the guidance of instructors. Most students participate in the study of one to two orders of the Mishna. There are a number of advanced students who successfully complete three to four, and occasionally all six orders of the Mishna in the course of two semesters of study. (The six orders of Mishnayot deal with Agricultural Laws, the Sabbath and Festivals, Marriage,  Civil Law, the Sacrificial Order, and Defilement and Purity).
 
Credits: 2 per semester
 
B. Torah She'bichtav (Bible)
 
 
1. 
Intermediate Chumash (Pentateuch)
 
This course introduces the student to the commentary of Rashi, the most widely studied commentary to the Bible. Rashi's methodologies are analyzed and his use of Midrashic sources is emphasized.
 
Credits: 3 per semester
 
 
2. 
Advanced Chumash (Pentateuch)
 
Students use preparatory self-study sessions to study the Chumash text with Rashi commentary. Classroom lectures focus on selections from Ramban's (Nachmanides) Pentateuchal commentary.
 
Credits: 3 per semester
 
 
3. 
Nevi'im (Prophets)
 
A topical study of the Book of Samuel which seeks to analyze character, wording and plot line, and develop the numerous halachic issues contained therein. Much use is made of the encyclopedic Midrashic work Yalkut Shimoni which is a required text for the course.
 
Credits: 2 per semester
 
 
4. 
Ketuvim (Hagiographa)
 
The Book of Daniel is studied. Special emphasis is placed on Daniel's dream interpretation and his eschatological vision as viewed by the Midrash and traditional commentaries.
  Credits: 2 per semester


 

 
5. Nevi'im (Early Prophets)
  A survey course of the Early Prophets, which places emphasis on acquainting the student with the story line in these works, and additionally sensitizes him to the religious, ethical and textual issues involved.
  Credits: 2 per semester
 
 
 
C. Halacha (Rabbinic Law)
 
 
1. 
Prayer and Benedictions
 
A survey of rabbinic law as it pertains to daily life with a focus on the laws of prayer, tzitzit, tefillin and brachot. The pre-dominant goal of this course is to provide the requisite information for proper halachic observance. The text studied is Kitzur Shulchan Aruch with Piskei Mishna Brurah.
 
Credits: 2 per semester
 
 
2. 
Laws of Sabbath
 
The goals of the course are twofold: the development of skills necessary for proper halachic research, and the attainment of the knowledge necessary for proper Sabbath observance. Texts studied are Mishna Brurah and Shmirat Shabbat Ke'hilchata.
 
Credits: 2 per semester
 
 
3. 
Integrated Halacha
 
This program, especially designed for advanced students, seeks to integrate the bekiut text studied in the evening bekiut seder with an intensive study of the Tur-Shulchan Aruch texts pertaining to the particular area studied.
 
Credits: 3 per semester
 
 
D. Machshava (Jewish Philosophy)
 
 
1. 
Machshava (Survey)
 
This course introduces the student to a variety of central issues in Jewish Philosophy including repentance, centrality of Torah, bitachon, Eretz Yisrael, etc. Selections from varied texts are studied.
 
Credits: 2 per semester
 
 
2. 
Contemporary Jewish Thought
 
Selections from twentieth century Jewish thought are studied. Various schools of contemporary Jewish thought are identified.
 
Credits: 2 per semester
 
 
3. 
Mussar (Jewish Ethical Thought)
 
A classic mussar text is studied with the emphasis placed on the position of man as a social and moral being. Texts include Mesilat Yesharim (Path of the Just), Darkei Teshuvah (Ways of Repentance), etc.
 
Credits: 2 per semester
 
E. Hebrew Language and Literature
 
 
1. 
Beginner's Hebrew
 
This Ulpan course introduces basic Hebrew grammar, syntax and reading comprehension to students with weak Hebrew background. Language of instruction is Hebrew.
 
Credits: 2 per semester
 
F. Leadership Training
 
 
1. 
Leadership Training Seminar
 
A multi-session seminar, which seeks to prepare students for leadership roles in their communities. Sessions include: group dynamics, personal guidance, group games, etc.
 
Credits: 1 per course

Credit Calculation
Credits are calculated on the basis of one credit for one academic hour (50 minutes) of classroom study. Two hours of individual preparation are required for each hour of classroom study.

Language of Instruction
Most classes at Yeshivat Ohr Yerushalayim are conducted in English. Some advanced courses are taught in Hebrew. Students at all levels are expected to enter with a basic knowledge of Hebrew sufficient for the study of original Hebrew texts.

Semesters
While the academic year is divided into semesters, courses in the second semester are generally a continuation of first semester courses. A number of the minor courses such as courses B3 and B5 are taught in alternate years and therefore are not necessarily available in any given semester. The same applies to Section D courses.